In Waai Weekly Impact we bring you the good news. Each week we curate three stories about positive impact worth sharing. See how others from all around the world inspire to make a difference.

Recycling ‘unrecyclable’ plastic with steam

Source: Fastcompany

Mura Technology is designing a new plant to process hard-to-recycle plastic using supercritical steam. The steam breaks down the chemical bonds in plastic to create building blocks that can be used to make new plastic. Unlike traditional recycling methods that ‘downcycle’ the plastic to a lower quality, the new way of recycling creates an endless loop in reusing old plastic. Steve Mahon, CEO at Mura Technology, believes that this new technology can fill a critical gap. The new facility is set to open in 2022 and is designed to process 80,000 pound of plastic waste a year.

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The campaign of a 10-year-old against usage of plastic waste

Source: Guardian

Skye Neville, a 10-year-old from Fairbourne, Wales, became outraged by the useless, cheap plastic toys that are attached to her magazines and comics. That’s why she started a petition to ban these toys, with the idea to protect our planet and future generations. In four months, the brand Waitrose vowed to stop selling children’s magazines containing “disposable” toys, crediting Skye with the inspiration. Skye’s campaign is especially poignant as her coastal community is threatened by climate change. Her attention to the impact of plastic will hopefully inspire other young people to realise their voice can be heard if they are passionate about an issue.

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Starbucks goes carbon neutral

Source: Fastcompany

Starbucks plans to reach its goal of making the production of its raw coffee beans carbon neutral by the end of the decade. In trials with smallholder farmers, they are testing a new app that can scan the soil and instantly give farmers details about the health of it. This means fertilizer, a major source of emissions, can be targeted only to the places that it’s needed. It can also track how carbon is stored in the soil over time as farmers take additional steps like planting shade trees next to coffee. This new app is part of a larger plan to cut carbon emissions in half by 2030 and a long term aim to give more to the planet than take.

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