In Waai Weekly Impact we bring you the good news. Each week we curate three stories about positive impact worth sharing. See how others from all around the world inspire to make a difference.

Polestar’s climate-neutral car

Source: Fast Company

Polestar, a Swedish electric car company owned by Volvo, is designing a climate-neutral car by 2030, they want to find a solution that will radically reduce emissions within this decade. The company plans to reach net zero emissions overall by 2040. They say “climate-neutral” rather than “carbon neutral” to emphasize the fact that it’s tackling all greenhouse gases, not just carbon. Since the company only produces electric cars, its products already have a sustainability edge, but even if a car charges on renewable electricity and emits no pollution from its engine, manufacturing still has a significant impact. Polestar is set to change that with their new car. While the climate-neutral car is still in the pilot stage, the suppliers are making progress. The company dreams of an industry that actually can eliminate carbon emissions and will stop the reliance on fossil fuels.

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Sea rice, changing the way humanity eats

Source: The Guardian

Did you ever imagine the grain of seagrass as an ingredient? When Ángel León, marine chef at 3-star restaurant Aponiente’s, took a look at Zostera marina, a clutch of tiny green grains clinging to the base of eelgrass, he wanted to try. The chef is set to recast the common eelgrass as a potential superfood. Zostera marina is gluten-free, high in omega-6 and -9 fatty acids, and contains 50% more protein than rice per grain. The plant’s impact could stretch much further. It is capable of capturing carbon 35 times faster than tropical rainforests and absorbs annually 10% of the ocean’s carbon, and the only thing it needs is seawater and movement. A pilot project was launched to adapt three small areas across a third of a hectare of salt marshes into what León calls a “marine garden”.

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UPS going electric

Source: Fast Company

After replacing trucks with electronic vehicles, UPS is looking at a way to reduce emissions from their airplanes. The mailing company has a plan to start using small electric planes to deliver packages between stations. The planes can make fast, zero-emissions trips with time-sensitive cargo ready to go again in a little less than an hour. After more testing, and pending approval of the vehicle from the Federal Aviation Administration, UPS plans to begin using them in 2024. Competitor FedEx also recently announced to fully transition its global fleet to zero-emissions and electric vehicles by 2040, pledging to invest $2 billion towards this transition.

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