In Waai Weekly Impact we bring you the good news. Each week we curate three stories about positive impact worth sharing. See how others from all around the world inspire to make a difference.

Spider silk as compostable plastic

Source: Fast Company

Common products often contain tiny capsules made of microplastics. These plastics are very hard to recycle and have a big impact on the environment, they wash down the drain and pollute waterways. The startup Xampla is trying to find a solution for this problem. They have created a new material that mimics spider silk, one of the strongest natural materials on a molecular level. The material is plant-based and can easily dissolve. This means it can break down in a home compost bin, unlike many other compostable plastics that require specific conditions only found at industrial composting facilities. Xampla plans to release its first products later this year.

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This island protects the mainland

Source: Fast Company

While seawater continues to rise, cities have to adapt to prevent being flooded. Copenhagen is building a huge island in the in the middle of the Port of Copenhagen. It will help protect the city from storms and rising seawater by acting as a dam. Meanwhile the island doubles as new housing for 35,000 residents. The beach of the island serves as a buffer for the water, instead of holding the water back, the open coast can absorb it. Although there was initial disagreement between critics and the government, the plans will be seen through. Over the coming decades, the artificial island will protect the city.

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McCains commitment to 100% regenerative agriculture

Source: New York Times

McCain, world’s largest potato producer, commits to 100% regenerative agriculture by 2030. Regenerative agriculture consists of several things, one valuable tool for farmers is cover crops. These are crops that help isolate carbon and enhance the soil’s ability to maintain moisture. An example of a cover crop is alfalfa. Alfalfa has deep roots that break up lower levels of the soil while fixing nitrogen. Even though there are no set requirements for regenerative agriculture, McCain states on its website that it has four commitments in its approach to sustainable farming: mitigating climate change, enabling sustainable water usage, promoting good agricultural practices, and supporting innovation and technology.

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